Client Bill of Rights

Clients have the right to:

  • Request and receive information about the therapist’s professional capabilities, including licensure, education, training, experience, professional association membership, specialization and limitations.
  • Have written information about fees, payment methods, insurance reimbursement, number of sessions, substitutions (in cases of vacation and emergencies), and cancellation policies before beginning therapy.
  • Receive respectful treatment that will be helpful to you.
  • A safe environment, free from sexual, physical and emotional abuse.
  • Ask questions about your therapy.
  • Refuse to answer any question or disclose any information you choose not to reveal.
  • Request and receive information from the therapist about your progress.
  • Know the limits of confidentiality and the circumstances in which a therapist is legally required to disclose information to others.
  • Know if there are supervisors, consultants, students, or others with whom your therapist will discuss your case.
  • Refuse a particular type of treatment, or end treatment without obligation or harassment.
  • Refuse electronic recording (but you may request it if you wish).
  • Request and (in most cases) receive a summary of your file, including the diagnosis, your progress, and the type of treatment.
  • Report unethical and illegal behavior by a therapist.
  • Receive a second opinion at any time about your therapy or therapist’s methods.
  • Have a copy of your file transferred to any therapist or agency you choose.

From Professional Therapy Never Includes Sex published by the California Department of Consumer Affairs.

Go HERE to book an appointment. 

©2018 Robin Slavin, LMHC, MA License #7459
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Recent Posts

How to Stop Work From Working Your Last Nerve

Many people come to therapy feeling overwhelmed and overworked. What is often being neglected is a self-care routine that can build resilience, reduce anxiety, and increase calm, making life in general more satisfying and enjoyable. This article outlines all the details:

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

Whether you hunkering down at home, or showing up at your job, work can be a big contributor to life stress. Here’s help.

By Gary McClain

MAY 05 2021 7:24 PM EDT

So here’s how the cycle works:

A hard day at work. You hit traffic on the way in. The boss is in a bad mood. A co-worker is out sick and you have to pick up the slack. Customers are acting like customers and being especially difficult. Under pressure, you crank out a rush job. And you make an error.

The result? You guessed it! Stress.

And what didn’t happen that day?

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